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Peter Panzerfaust 9Peter Panzerfaust #9

Words by Kurtis Wiebe

Pictures by Tyler Jenkins

Colors by Heather Breckel

Review by Adam Shaw

 

Last month left us with a pretty big cliffhanger, but also re-introduced Kapitan Haken (Captain Hook). Issue #9 of Peter Panzerfaust goes deeper into exploring who he is and what exactly makes him tick. (Do you see what I did there? Tick? The crocodile? Seriously, haven’t you read or watched Peter Pan before? Sheesh.)

Wiebe, Jenkins, and Breckel all present and contribute to the shift in tone and narrative. For most of the issue the narrative focuses on Haken and his ideology. Although he is a twisted character, the conviction and sure belief that he is doing the right thing is how Wiebe is able to establish some understanding of the character. We also learn that Peter’s motives and reasoning for coming to Europe may not have been as straightforward as he once said. I’ve always liked the notion that Peter and Hook could be two sides of the same coin, each slightly warped in their own way; entangled and entwined in a twisted sort of game.

For me the real star of this issue was the art from Jenkins and Breckel.  Breckel continues to nail the tone of each issue with her choices in color palette. Jenkins’s movement of the characters between panels almost makes the pages feel alive. The subtle movement of Haken’s hand, hook, and head really sells that this character is moving about the pages. For a moment I felt as though I was in that room and he was pacing around me.

When the pace picks up in a sort of duel between the two, Jenkins continues to smoothly dance the characters around the page. It was done incredibly seamlessly, and I didn’t notice it at first. I normally read Peter Panzerfaust on my iPad, but this time I was lucky enough to be reading an advance review copy. I only mention this because as I was scrolling quickly back to the beginning of the book I noticed the movement. It was like glancing at a flip book. I’d recommend for you paper readers to turn the pages quickly, and for you digital readers to turn on guided view and swipe through those panels quickly for a nice treat.

The Verdict

If you aren’t reading this series you are doing yourself a huge disservice. Pick up this issue alone just for the art. The almost animated feel of the pages from Jenkins is amazing, and Wiebe continues to deliver some stunning characterization.

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