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By Courtney Key

A legal battle poised to head to the Supreme Court was forestalled Friday, as the heirs of legendary comic creator Jack Kirby reached a settlement with Marvel.

Jack Kirby at work.

Jack Kirby at work.

The details of the settlement have not been publicly released, but Marvel and the Kirby estate issued a joint statement regarding the decision.

“Marvel and the family of Jack Kirby have amicably resolved their legal disputes, and are looking forward to advancing their shared goal of honoring Mr. Kirby’s significant role in Marvel’s history,” the statement read.

At issue in the dispute was whether the heirs of Kirby, who died in 1994, had the right in 2009 to issue termination notices on 262 works that Kirby had a hand in creating between 1958 and 1963. The notices went out to Marvel, Fox, Paramount, Sony, and other studios which have made films based on Kirby’s characters.

The Kirby family argued that the termination notices were valid because Kirby held a copyright interest in those works. Marvel’s position was that Kirby, as a work-for-hire artist, had no copyright interest in the characters. Marvel and Disney filed suit against the heirs in 2010 to invalidate the termination notices. A lower court ruled for Marvel in 2011, and an appeal by the heirs to the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals was subsequently denied.

Had the appeal by the Kirbys to the Supreme Court been successful, the heirs would have been entitled to possibly millions of dollars of royalties on movies such as Iron Man and The Avengers, and Marvel would have had to negotiate with them for the right to use Kirby’s characters in future films.

The Kirbys would have been entitled to royalties from movies including The Avengers had their suit prevailed.

The Kirbys would have been entitled to royalties from movies including The Avengers had their suit prevailed.

In addition, repercussions would have been felt across the comics industry as work-for-hire creators suddenly gained a basis for claiming copyright interest in their works.

Source: Deadline.com

About The Author

Contributor

Courtney is a returning reader to the world of comic books, drawn back in by the power of Tom Hiddleston’s portrayal of Loki in the MCU and her attraction to broken antagonists with questionable hair. Favorite titles she’s currently reading include Loki Agent of Asgard, Saga, Silver Surfer, Ms. Marvel, Gotham Academy, and The Wicked + The Divine. Older favorite comics are Lucifer, Sandman, Kieron Gillen’s Journey into Mystery and Young Avengers, and Runaways. When she is not watching television or reading comics and novels, Courtney torments herself by attempting to write fiction. Her favorite apocalyptic scenario is the eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano. She enjoys riding horses and distrusts chickens, which she considers to be merely T-Rexes in a clever disguise. One day they’ll reveal their true colors and you’ll see. You’ll all see.

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