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Writer: Geoff Johns

Artist: Gary Frank

Colors: Brad Anderson

Letters: Rob Leigh

Book Matter Design: Amie Brockway-Metcalf

A Partnership Made for Comic’s History?

The clock keeps ticking as Doomsday Clock #3 continues to count down the DC Universe a little bit closer to the apocalypse. The tension is palatable throughout the issue as the darkness continues to wrap the reader in its cold embrace. Doomsday Clock #3 not only expands the main story of the remnants of the Watchmen universe invading the DC universe. Doomsday Clock #3 also introduces the tale within the tale of Nathaniel Dusk, an obscure noir DC Detective created by Gene Colon and Don McGregor, that is pulled into a murder mystery that makes little sense. The issue then finishes with the ‘30s era tabloid detailing the shocking entertainment gossip about the final fate of the actor who portrayed Nathaniel Dusk in the classic serials. I enjoyed the main story, which continues the search for Doctor Manhattan. Adrian Veidt, Ozymandias, comes face to face with his actions from all the way back in Watchmen #1 as the Comedian has issues with what happened to him in that high rise apartment. Rorschach comes to an understanding with Batman as he passes on the original Rorschach’s journal so Batman can understand what’s at stake if they can’t find Doctor Manhattan. And finally The Marionette and the Mime, in all their psychotic glory, decide to take in the sites of Gotham.

From DC Obscurity to Doomsday Clock Stardom….Nathaniel Dusk

While I enjoyed the super heroics and story of the DC and Watchmen interaction I found myself more intrigued with the happenings of a retirement home. The readers are able to observe two residents arguing over TV time, one wanting to watch the news and apparent unraveling of society, the other wants to watch a classic Nathaniel Dusk noir classic, which just like the Tales of the Black Freighter in the original Watchmen becomes a story within a story here. How this Nathaniel Dusk classic and the Tabloid back matter that delves deeper into the Hollywood production of the film plays into the larger story is still unknown, but with classic names linked to the Justice Society and the wartime heroes of the DC universe I am definitely interested, especially as we touch base with another retiree in this home, one Johnny Thunder, who is waiting for a return…. a return of what is still unknown but longtime DC readers might have an idea and hope.

The Marionette visiting the sites of Gotham

Johns and Frank do a magnificent job of embracing the darkness that clouds Doomsday Clock. Just as the original Watchmen was a dark and murky tale of a society on the brink of collapse Doomsday Clock mimics that feel. Unlike the nuclear war detailed in Watchmen Doomsday Clock is on the brink of war over the metagene and the predominance of metahumans being Americans. While the story takes the forefront it is the background where the fear is ramped up. With the riots and terror apparent on the faces of the citizens of the world as they splash across television screens. The rise in metahumans puts the fear of ‘gods’ in foreign countries while the citizens of America country call for their heroes to answer questions as well as for their actions. Doomsday Clock is set a year in the future of the current DC Universe and if this is the future it looks anything but bright. I can’t wait to see what comes next.

Verdict: Doomsday Clock continues to be an impressive feet, from its pure homage to Watchmen in appearance and story with the added bonus of including the heroes (and villains) of the DC Universe. Doomsday Clock feels like an actual Event with weight and gravitas. I didn’t know that I wanted this comic until I started reading it. For me, Doomsday Clock #3 is a BUY.

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