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Royals #1 Review

Written by Al Ewing

Art by Jonboy Meyers

Colours by Ryan Kinnaird

Letters by VC’s Clayton Cowles

Reviewed by Lorna Maltman (maltmanlorna@gmail.com)

The Inhumans have had a rough time of it recently, with them being painted as villains, killing off the mutants. I must admit that the main reason I picked up, or was intrigued by, Royals was that Jonboy Meyers was on art (I loved his work on Teen Titans before his unceremonious departure). In this issue, though, Ewing weaves an intriguing and accessible tale that sets up great adventures for future issues.

This first issue starts five thousand years in the future, where, through some unknown events, Black Bolt (who, whilst slightly decrepit, is looking good for his age) is the last Inhuman. Jump to the current day, where the Kree Marvel Boy informs the Inhumans that he knows where to find the secret of who the Inhumans truly are, and it is on the Kree home world. Cue a quest with the Inhuman Royal family in space to find the future of the Inhumans as a species.

Ewing does a great job of establishing the characters, their personalities, and relationships without making it feel overly forced or out of place. There is a cliff-hanger ending, but unlike many other shock endings it achieves its job and makes me intrigued to find out the answers instead of being annoyed about there being a cliff-hanger. Whilst for people more versed in the Inhumans this issue may have been too much set up, it does give a good basis for the series jump off from and I can’t wait for Ewing to tackle the space adventures ahead.

Furthermore, the main reason for me initially read this issue, is Meyer’s art. It does not disappoint. Meyers brings such liveliness and at the same time regal sense to the characters, with his style fitting perfectly into this sci-fi royal family. I’m excited to see his future work on this series.

Verdict:

Buy.  This issue is primarily set up (but what first issue isn’t ?) and it does feel essential to read. Ewing does a good job quickly introducing the main protagonists of this series and giving each of them a moment in this issue, no matter how brief. However, if that does not entice you, the art means you must pick this up, as Meyers hits it out of the park.

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