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imagine_agents1

Imagine Agents #1
Written by Brian Joines
Illustrated by Bachan
Colors by Ruth Redmond
Review by Mike Duke

Have you ever wondered what would happen if you crossed Foster’s Home For Imaginary Friends with Men in Black? Neither had I, but apparently Brian Joines and Bachan did. That, in a nutshell, is what you get with Imagine Agents. Imaginary friends do what they are supposed to do most of the time, but when they get out of line, the Imagine Agents step in. It’s an imaginative idea that combines familiar elements into something original and very fun.

Issue #1 begins with Agents Slatern, the jaded veteran, and Snowgoose, the clumsy rookie, in pursuit of a very destructive imaginary friend. He’s caused so much damage in the neighborhood that multiple insurance claims and police reports have already been filed. However, he’s no match for the agents of I.M.A.G.I.N.E.–the Institute for the Management, Acclimation, Guardianship, and Incarceration of Notional Entities. From there, we get to meet Elliot and his friend Furdlegurr, who seem to be at the center of the story conflict in this four-issue-miniseries. Elliot has trouble with a bully, and Furdlegurr is approached by some other imaginaries who warn him that a revolution is coming for all of their kind. In the rest of the issue, we switch back and forth between the agents and Elliot, and we learn a lot more about the rules of this world and the imaginary friends. We get to see The Community, where the good friends go when no one believes in them anymore, and we meet the main antagonist on the final page.

I loved this book. The rules of the world make sense but are also original and unique enough to keep my interest. The story features kids, adults, and imaginaries all in equal measure, and the voices all sound authentic and age appropriate. Most importantly, the story is truly all-ages–not only did I enjoy it, but so did my 16 year-old son, and I plan to let my 10 year-old son read it also. Boom don’t seem to be marketing it as such, but I really believe that comic readers of all ages will enjoy this title. My only problem with the book is that it’s only four issues.

The art here is beautiful, cute, funny, and entertaining all at the same time. I am not familiar with Bachan’s work, but I will definitely be looking him\her up in the future. The kids are expressive and funny while also feeling true-to-life, the imaginaries are each hilariously unique and fun, and the adult characters are appropriately subdued without losing their expressiveness. Vibrant colors and imagination abound on every page.

Verdict

Buy it! Boom studios is really putting out some great creator-owned work right now, and Imagine Agents is a shining example. And really, anyone who is publishing non- licensed, all-ages stories is doing the lord’s work, in my humble opinion. With it being only four issues, Imagine Agents could be one that you wait for in trade, but there is a small hope in me that strong sales might lead to an ongoing title. However you go about it, though, go get it! Imagine Agents is too much fun to miss!

About The Author

Reviewer
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Mike is a husband, father, writer, gamer, and all around geek. His life’s ambition is to write the fictions, either in film, books, or comics. He is currently working on a couple of comics with artists local to his home in Denver, Colorado, which will be available in 2014. He loves all kinds of games–card, board, video, etc. (including the ones you don’t usually tell your friends you like.) He’s been collecting and reading comics since he was a youngster with some gaps to accommodate for things like kids and no money. His favorite stories include anything 2099, Elseworlds-like superhero arcs, and vintage 90′s Vertigo and Image. When he’s not posting reviews on Talking Comic Books, he’s also not posting his writing on his writing blog, or not writing his comic book, etc.

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