Comic Book Jeopardy!

A bit o’ stuff by Bob Reyer

As I’ve had a few requests (and despite some of them, I’m not retiring!), I thought that I should post the quiz from our 100th episode bonus feature, Comic Book Jeopardy. The questions were locked in a vault at the Chase Manhattan Bank, and were never out of the sight of our crack security force whilst in transit to Reese’s 1900 Pub. The answers of course, will be kept in a sealed mayonaise jar on Funk & Wagnalls’ porch, so you’ll have to ask nicely to see them!

Now without further ado, in the immortal words of Don Pardo (or maybe it was Johnny Gilbert?) “Let’s Play Jeopardy!”

The categories are: Golden Age, Silver Age, Modern Age, Creators, Movies, and Television. Remember, your response has to be in the form of a question!

 

GOLDEN AGE

$100: Batman made his debut in this comic book.

$200: These two long-running elemental characters were the lead features in Marvel Comics #1 in 1939.

$300: The creator of The Spirit, his name is now attached to the Comic Book Hall of Fame Awards.

$400: A short story in All-Star Comics #8 was the first appearance of this iconic character.

$500: This book by Dr. Fredric Wertham caused the introduction of the Comics Code, and effectively ended the Golden Age.

SILVER AGE

$100: Father of a current fan favorite, he followed Steve Ditko as penciller on the Amazing Spider-Man.

$200: This diminutive character was the villain in Fantastic Four #1 in 1961.

$300: She made her debut in Detective Comics #359 in 1967.

$400: Her father was a Golden Age sorcerer who debuted in Action Comics #1, and her first appearance in 1964’s  Hawkman #1 was in search of him!

DAILY DOUBLE:  The category is “Doubles”, and the answer is:

In 1961, Flash #123 featured the story “The Flash of Two Worlds” and the return of the Golden Age Flash, whose civilian identity was this.

$500: This is the primary way to get Mr. Mxyzptlk to return to the Fifth Dimension.

MODERN AGE

$100: He was the writer and creator of Watchmen.

$200: In 1988-89, dialing 1-900-720-2666 was a vote for this, -2660 a vote against.

$300: This series’ first arc featured a murder mystery investigated by a detective named Bigby Wolf

$400: This character’s debut was on the last page of the Incredible Hulk #180.

$500: Armed with a gas gun in the Forties, this character lent his name to an award-winning fantasy series in 1989. 

CREATORS

$100: These Cleveland teenagers created Superman.

$200: The writer and artist behind the Hugo and Harvey Award winning series Saga.

DAILY DOUBLE: We’ll stay with creators, and the answer is:

 She came to comics fan’s attention through her website “Women in Refrigerators”, before entering the industry as a writer on The Simpsons, Deadpool, Wonder Woman, Birds of Prey, and Batgirl.

$300: This writer/artist team presided over the X-Men’s resurgence, with stories such as “Death of the Phoenix” and “Days of Future Past”.

$400: Her first Marvel Comics work was a series of “Women of Marvel” one-shots, before re-launching “Earth’s Mightiest Hero”.

$500: Although not as a team, these two giants each had their work appear in Captain America #3 in 1941.

 

MOVIES

$100: He plays Agent Phil Coulson in the Marvel Universe films.

$200: She has been played by three different actresses across the three main-line X-Men films.

$300: Larry “Buster” Crabbe played him in three cliffhanger serials for Universal from 1936 to 1940.

$400: This Academy Award winner was credited as “Special Guest Director” for his work on one scene in Sin City.

$500: This former Miss America played Catwoman in the 1966 theatrically-released Batman film.

TELEVISION

$100: Before starring as TV’s Superman, this actor’s screen debut was in Gone with the Wind.

$200: Only naturally, this comics and TV creator wrote a series called Marvel Zombies in 2005.

$300: This villain was Batman’s first adversary on the premier episode of the 1966 TV show.

$400: On TV in 2002, they were played by Rachel Skarsten, Ashley Scott and Dina Meyer.

$500: This actor twice portrayed The Trickster on the 1990 Flash TV series.

FINAL JEOPARDY

Women in Comics

Created in 1941 by cartoonist Tarpe Mills (above), she was the comics world’s first costumed heroine.

 

That’s it for this episode of Comic Book Jeopardy! The answers will appear in this space after allowing those playing to puzzle over them a bit, but I will post them in fairly short order, never fear!

 SOUNDTRACK: Of course, it’s an episode of “Celebrity Jeopardy”!  (You’ll have to use the link to jump to You Tube, sorry–but come right back, won’t you?)

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAENzsxv8qY

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAENzsxv8qY[/youtube]

 

 

 

 

 

 

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About The Author

Associate Editor and Podcast Co-Host

Bob was rocketed to Earth as an infant after his parents were scared by a huge bat! Landing on an island of Amazons, he was injected with the super-soldier serum and sent into space where he was bombarded with cosmic rays! This might explain his love for comics, but probably not. 'Nuff said?

One Response

  1. Tammy

    Comics are a great way to communicate diverse issues that really engage their audiences. Naif Al-Mutawa was recently praised by Barack Obama for his Islamic Comics creation, The 99 which presents Islamic influenced superheroes as a way of combating stereotypes and offering different perspectives on .

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